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Hunting WTSHTF
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Thread: Hunting WTSHTF

  1. #1
    barrypina
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    Hunting WTSHTF

    Just wondering if those of you who are "hunters" think that you would be able to feed your family by hunting. I am not a hunter but the feed-back I get from my hunting friends is that it takes many days of hunting to actually bring in significant amounts of meat. I have to guess that it takes more than a few small game animals to feed say a family of four. Also, wouldn't everyone with a rifle be out trying to bring home the bacon? I would be very concerned about hunting accidents with so many amateurs in the woods.

  2. #2
    wayne1911
    Guest

    Re: Hunting WTSHTF

    Here in southern New Hampshire deer are in abundance. With that said, there are not enough deer or wildlife to support the town(s) populace. I would not be concerned as much with accidents as I would with availability. During hunting season there would be X number of hunters in the woods. In an emergency "feed the family" situation everyone would be in the woods, including those who have never hunted, and the food supply would be decimated in a few days. All the more reason to lay in a supply of food and rotate it. Hunting won't work.

    Wayne <><

  3. #3
    imported_BackCountry
    Guest

    Re: Hunting WTSHTF

    I think many would be extremely disappointed with their results. If an 'amateur' did manage to take a whitetail or elk or whatever, they will be immediately overwhelmed by 'what now?' Getting meat to the table after the shot is simple, but not if you've never seen it done or had someone teach you. Also, the quality of that meat will depend entirely on how the animal is handled after the shot.

    I've seen folks new to hunting eager to learn and participate in field dressing, skinning and boning big-game. However, the first time all by yourself is different experience.

    I would also agree that if everyone took the hills to feed the family our game populations will either be totally overrun or will leave the area and only those experienced in woodcraft will eat fresh meat

  4. #4
    Old Blue
    Guest

    Re: Hunting WTSHTF

    I love to hunt deer but I have to drive at least an hour to get to any kind of decent hunting area. The point is well made from previous posts about the wild game population being decimated in a few weeks by people hunting for food. I think if we look at third world countries the solution will be obvious. My family has spent time in China. It the animal swims, slithers, walks, hops, or squawks it is edible in rural China. So it will be with us in an urban survival situation.

    It may not be possible to drive to a hunting area anyway in a SHTF situation. Look at locally trapping critters such as squirrels and rabbits in your back yard. In lieu of trapping a pellet gun will work well in most urban areas (with some cautions). And in an extended situation you may be forced to eat dog, cat, wood chuck, or other various rodent species. People in third world countries eat what ever protein source they can sink their teeth into.

    I have a neighbor who had a wood chuck raid his garden on a regular basis. The wood chuck went to work in the garden "fertilizer department" one day when the neighbor shot it with a sub sonic .22 round. My neighbor was standing in the middle of his kitchen and shooting out of an open window (he had a safe berm and brick wall back ground). After deeply burying the offending rodent in the garden my neighbor asked me if I had heard the shot. I did not notice and probably passed the sound off as back ground road noise. I hope some of these ideas help.

  5. #5
    oldfatguy
    Guest
    Looks like the guys ahead of me answered this question pretty thoroughly. The only thing I can add is: you can trap birds with mouse or rat traps, depending upon the size of the birds. In the winter, there are bound to be lots of hungry birds, and during the spring and summer, their may be even more, since they all have young to feed. The way I used traps like these when I was a kid, was to paint the wooden part of the trap and the tip of the bait pedal with clear karo syrup, and then sprinkle bird seeds (from the store) over the sticky areas of the trap. The trap was effectively camouflaged, and I ALWAYS caught birds. I didn't eat them, of course--I had snakes that ate birds and it was the cheapest way a kid could keep his "pets" fed. Another wilderness foraging technique you may want to try if it's legal in your state, is trotlining. This is a method of fishing in which you place a line with 25 or so baited, large (2/0) barbed hooks (check your state game laws on this) in a body of water where fish may be reasonably expected. Friends of mine that use empty soda bottles as floats attached at the middle of their trotline keep most of it off of the bottom, and actually catch game fish (bass, trout) from time to time. I tie a cinder block on the end of my trotline and drop it on the bottom. I use small crayfish for bait--tearing them in half, and placing only half on each hook. My catch is almost entirely of catfish. Because the hooks are fairly large, I never catch small fish, and I always catch mutliple fish in the lakes in which I use this rig (Cochiti and Elephant Butte lakes). Crayfish are an excellent bait because their shell (exoskeleton) keeps them on the hook, so they can't slurped off of it by fish that get away. If you use large, living crayfish, these too, will attract large fish. The problem there is that live crayfish can defend themselves, and catfish (little smarter than a battery-operated toy) will avoid being pinched by simply grabbing the live crayfish and alternately crushing them within their jaws and then dropping them almost immediately before they can be pinched, and repeat this maneuver over and over until the crayfish is dead and in pieces. They'll then slurp up the pieces of the crayfish off the bottom of the lake and swim away, without being hooked. So, use small crayfish, torn in half--they'll inhale the whole thing, and won't get away. I chum the waters here in NM (it's legal in some lakes, here) by taking a can of meat-type dogfood, punching holes in each end of it with a hunting knife and dropping in the lake about 50 yards upstream of my line. The "gravy" from the can will carry a long way downstream (all of our lakes are river-fed, manmade) luring catfish from hundreds of yards away. Practise this method of survival fishing BEFORE you have to rely on it, to determine what works best for you, in the waterways in your area. When buying a trotline, look for one of the brands that have detachable hook lines. These types of lines won't tangle into a hopeless mess in windy weather while you're trying to retrieve them. Always sharpen the hooks--practically no fishhooks are sharp as they're shipped from the manufacturer. A good way to tell if a hook is sharp enough is to test it by tapping the point agains a fingernail. If it seems to stick in the surface (don't puncture your nail), it's sharp enough. Best of luck!

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by barrypina View Post
    Just wondering if those of you who are "hunters" think that you would be able to feed your family by hunting. I am not a hunter but the feed-back I get from my hunting friends is that it takes many days of hunting to actually bring in significant amounts of meat. I have to guess that it takes more than a few small game animals to feed say a family of four. Also, wouldn't everyone with a rifle be out trying to bring home the bacon? I would be very concerned about hunting accidents with so many amateurs in the woods.
    In this kind of survival situation, regular hunting rules would go out the window. I think you would be looking at catching song birds and cats & dogs. Big game would be cattle or hogs. Time spent away from the home would leave it vulerable to attack by scavangers and looters. It would be very easy to become the hunted, especially if you have killed a large animal and are transporting it.

    Bill M

  7. #7
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    The problem would be you would never be able to eat everying you bring home should it be a large animal. Perhaps, (and I am reluctant to suggest this as it opens you up to vulnerability) you could pair up with another survivor and share the take, often there is safety in numbers but knowing who to trust would be the issue. You would need to be VERY selective and cautious in doing so. I guess if the situation would present itself you would just have to make the call. Better chance of getting something with more hunting.

    I think that eventually people would attempt to congregate once things settle down, I mean that is how we ended up with towns.

  8. #8
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    In "One Second After", the townspeople very quickly hunted everything out including squirrels etc.; unless a large portion of the population were wiped out when TSHTF, wildlife and even house pets would be gone soon. It would probably be best to be in a rural area in order to have more land to share with your neighbors for hunting and possibly sustainable wildlife. I'm near the ocean, and have a surf fishing outfit for just in case!. Crawgir1
    'I'm not afraid of storms, for I'm learning to sail my ship' Louisa May Alcott

    -

  9. #9
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    Living near such a large water mass would be a big plus for survival, it would not supply all the required nutrition needed but in limited lengths of time of survival it would be very handy. Small chance of cleaning out the oceans of fish although it would become increasingly more difficult as the masses headed for such a large supply of food. Exposure would be the biggest concern.

  10. #10
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    Another factor to consider is that the population of people will quickly dwindle to a few survivors. Our current population is not able to survive the kind of event we are anticipating. Once the population is reduced to a fraction of our current population, game will rebound significantly. Land will become cheap or even free to those left to inhabit it. Anyone who is weak , sick, old or stupid will not survive. Unfortunatly this probably includes me but I won't tell you which one I am .

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