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sartx
01-15-2010, 11:24 AM
When I started out, I began storing items I knew I would need if the SHTF (food, water, soap, ways to start fire, lighting, etc.). I began reading various blogs and adding items and ideas to my preparedness. One day, I ran out of shampoo at home… What a bonehead… I realized I’d been neglecting a lot of everyday items so basic that I use them without thinking about it. I set a notepad and pen centrally in my home, and began listing every item/product/service I used throughout the day. Beside the item, I noted that I needed to stock up to a certain quantity, or how I would replace it in TEOTWAWKI. I did this for a few weeks, and still make notes if I discover something new. While this exercise did not yield monumental results, it did help me to identify items I take for granted but wouldn't want to be without: shampoo, laundry detergent, Q-Tips, 3-in-1 oil, WD-40, etc. This is very simplistic, but may be of assistance if you’re just starting out.

Scott

DavidMorris
01-21-2010, 09:38 PM
When I started out, I began storing items I knew I would need if the SHTF (food, water, soap, ways to start fire, lighting, etc.). I began reading various blogs and adding items and ideas to my preparedness. One day, I ran out of shampoo at home… What a bonehead… I realized I’d been neglecting a lot of everyday items so basic that I use them without thinking about it. I set a notepad and pen centrally in my home, and began listing every item/product/service I used throughout the day. Beside the item, I noted that I needed to stock up to a certain quantity, or how I would replace it in TEOTWAWKI. I did this for a few weeks, and still make notes if I discover something new. While this exercise did not yield monumental results, it did help me to identify items I take for granted but wouldn't want to be without: shampoo, laundry detergent, Q-Tips, 3-in-1 oil, WD-40, etc. This is very simplistic, but may be of assistance if you’re just starting out.

Scott

Scott, that's a GREAT point. It's amazing how many people have a few thousand rounds of ammo, but no Immodium AD. Or 30 #10 cans of food but no manual can opener. (yes...I have talked with someone who realized they'd made this mistake)

From a VERY practical standpoint, you're much more likely to benefit from having 6 months of everything you regularly use than you are from having 1000 rounds of ammo. People lose jobs, have illnesses, and economic downturns MUCH more often than they face TEOTWAWKI situations. The fear of SHTF will always push people to act, but it's "boring," everyday personal disasters that are most likely to happen.

imported_BackCountry
01-22-2010, 10:54 AM
We also track what we use in order to make sure we are planning and purchasing things we need daily.
One trick we use is to write the date on the can, bottle or package of something we use regularly and see how long it lasts. Then we can determine our need for one month, six months, one year or longer. It's a simple, but easy way to keep track of our use.
For instance, a regular can of coffee will last, on average, 43 days. That means we need 8.4 cans of coffee for one year. So the goal is 10 cans on the pantry shelf. We have made a habit of purchasing two items when one runs out. So if we don't have 10 cans of coffee, we buy two when a can is empty. Same with toothpaste, allergy meds, dog and cat food, etc. Again, an easy way to build up supplies without spending a ton of money and not letting things slip through the cracks.

sartx
01-22-2010, 03:20 PM
David - great point about the “everyday personal disasters” being more likely. That’s also a much easier sell to people who are “unbelievers”. What you express is the mode I’m in now. I’m fighting my gadget-freak urges and building up my “everyday supplies” (okay, I did just order the Surefire Backup flashlight you mentioned – had to have it after I read the specs and reviews…). Depending on expirations / shelf-life, my current priority is building to 1 to 2 years of all vitamins, supplements, personal hygiene products, and everything in the medicine cabinet (Imodium, Advil, Tylenol, sinus, cold/flu, peroxide, etc.). BackCountry – thanks for the tip on dating products to determine my annual usage. Economic collapse and raiding hordes of looters would be bad enough, but if I run out of my morning cup of Joe… I’ll put that tip into play immediately – thanks again.

Scott